OCD ISN’T A REAL CONDITION?

I can’t count how many times I’ve broken down from dealing with OCD, depression, and anxiety. How many tears I’ve shed; how many days I’ve felt like a waste of space, too tired to do anything productive; too scared of the future; too depressed to want to live anymore.

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Sorry, this concept really grinds my gears. This may just be my snarkiest post yet…

I HAVE IT AND I DON’T WANT IT

Being someone who has struggled with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder for way too long (seemingly most of my life), and to such extreme lengths, I can say for certain that OCD is real, and can be a life-deteriorating condition – and no, it doesn’t always include excessive cleaning rituals…

MISUSING THE TERM & WHY IT BOTHERS ME SO MUCH

I’m completely open to people saying what they want and having fun with it, but here’s why using the terms of health conditions to describe the way you feel about something bothers me…

“I’m so OCD about…” *insert your personal preference here*. Example: “I’m so OCD about keeping my house clean.”

Liking or preferring your house, your car, your office, whatever, to be clean is NOT AT ALL the same as having OCD. I mean, who doesn’t like their spaces to be clean?

The same goes for the phrase “I feel so bipolar”, or “I feel so depressed” (I know I say the latter, but I struggle with Depression. Unfortunately. And it’s a debilitating condition not worthy of a popularity contest.)

THEY’RE SO REAL, THEY KILL

Bipolar Disorder, Depression, OCD, and all of the mental health conditions in which people are suffering from every single day, and even committing suicide from, are serious conditions. The people suffering from them are not making a conscious “choice” to feel these ways, to have feelings or compulsions, such as liking their house to be clean or organizing their Skittles by color. (I’m not even touching on the more abstract compulsions, such as counting things, having having intrusive thoughts, etc.)

IT’S A TREND?

For some reason, it seems as though it’s considered “quirky” or “trendy” to say you have a mental health condition, like it makes you unique? Technically speaking, it may make you different from others around you, but having a condition isn’t like having a personality trait.

There’s this trend of that going on, yet at the same time, still an incredible amount of stigma around mental health… It’s pretty odd, if you ask me.

To say you have one, versus actually having one, are two totally different things. I don’t wish a mental health condition on anybody. Those who don’t suffer from one cannot immediately understand the stress and mental/emotional anguish that these conditions can cause.

I can’t count how many times I’ve broken down from dealing with OCD, depression, and anxiety. How many tears I’ve shed; how many days I’ve felt like a waste of space, too tired to do anything productive; too scared of the future; too depressed to want to live anymore.

Please be conscious of those suffering. I’m not aiming to tell people how to talk; I support speaking freely and enjoying the art of language, but I hope that people would choose to be more aware of those who suffer on a daily basis from things that they themselves don’t understand.

Thanks for listening to me rant.

“I do not have OCD OCD OCD.”
Emilie Autumn

“I’m tired of being inside my head. I want to live out here, with you.”
Colleen McCarty, Mounting the Whale

TMTF (tired mind typing fingers)

Photo from Pixabay.com, by Pexels.

Author: tiredmindtypingfingers

Writing about writing and chronic illness, and trying to make something out of it.

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